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One of my favorite parts of the 14-Day Credit Challenge is the buried treasures lesson because it gives students an opportunity to have massive personal growth and development.

You see, when I teach people how to find their buried treasures, I also give them a financial tip about changing their mindset. After all, finding money wont change your life if you rush out and spend it frivolously.

Instead, I give them a financial tool for personal growth and development.

Its called the Hour Factor™ question.

Let me explain ¦

Instead of considering price alone, always consider the Hour Factor™ before making a purchase. The Hour Factor™ is the number of hours you will need to work to pay for something.

And this number is a better indicator than the price. From a personal growth and development perspective, the most valuable thing we have is time ¦ time with our families, time pursuing our passions, time enjoying life. When you buy something, you are simultaneously making a commitment to spend time away from your family  (or away from your passions) so that you can work enough hours to pay for your purchase.

So before you purchase anything, always ask yourself the Hour Factor question: Is it worth it to work ____ hours to pay for this?

What do you think? Do you like this strategy? Leave a comment below and let me know …

And for those of you who want to use this strategy, heres the process:

1.     Start by figuring out your hourly after-tax wage. If you are paid hourly, just look at your paystub and divide the take-home (after-tax) pay by the number of hours your worked. If you are paid a salary, divide your annual after-tax salary by 2,080 hours (this is based upon a 40-hour work week, 52 weeks per year).  This is your after-tax wage.

2.     Then, divide the price of something by your after-tax salary to computer the number of hours you must work to buy it. For instance, if your after-tax pay is $12.50, you will have to work ten hours to pay for something that costs $125.

3.     Once you have done the math, ask the Hour Factor question. For instance: Is it worth it to work 10 hours away to pay for this? You can always change the question to make it more powerful. For instance, I ask: Is it worth it to work ____hours away from my children and wife to pay for this?

Is it worth 30 minutes of your time to pay for a latté and muffin from the corner coffee shop each morning?

Is it worth even 15 minutes? Or would you rather spend that money (and your time) on your childs college savings?

Its up to you! But one way or another, the Hour Factor question will represent a giant shift in your mindset. And its a powerful vehicle for personal growth and development.

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    Your Step by Step Credit Card Guide

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    Your Step by Step Credit Card Guide

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    One of my favorite parts of the 14-Day Credit Challenge is the buried treasures lesson because it gives students an opportunity to have massive personal growth and development.

    You see, when I teach people how to find their buried treasures, I also give them a financial tip about changing their mindset. After all, finding money wont change your life if you rush out and spend it frivolously.

    Instead, I give them a financial tool for personal growth and development.

    Its called the Hour Factor™ question.

    Let me explain ¦

    Instead of considering price alone, always consider the Hour Factor™ before making a purchase. The Hour Factor™ is the number of hours you will need to work to pay for something.

    And this number is a better indicator than the price. From a personal growth and development perspective, the most valuable thing we have is time ¦ time with our families, time pursuing our passions, time enjoying life. When you buy something, you are simultaneously making a commitment to spend time away from your family  (or away from your passions) so that you can work enough hours to pay for your purchase.

    So before you purchase anything, always ask yourself the Hour Factor question: Is it worth it to work ____ hours to pay for this?

    What do you think? Do you like this strategy? Leave a comment below and let me know …

    And for those of you who want to use this strategy, heres the process:

    1.     Start by figuring out your hourly after-tax wage. If you are paid hourly, just look at your paystub and divide the take-home (after-tax) pay by the number of hours your worked. If you are paid a salary, divide your annual after-tax salary by 2,080 hours (this is based upon a 40-hour work week, 52 weeks per year).  This is your after-tax wage.

    2.     Then, divide the price of something by your after-tax salary to computer the number of hours you must work to buy it. For instance, if your after-tax pay is $12.50, you will have to work ten hours to pay for something that costs $125.

    3.     Once you have done the math, ask the Hour Factor question. For instance: Is it worth it to work 10 hours away to pay for this? You can always change the question to make it more powerful. For instance, I ask: Is it worth it to work ____hours away from my children and wife to pay for this?

    Is it worth 30 minutes of your time to pay for a latté and muffin from the corner coffee shop each morning?

    Is it worth even 15 minutes? Or would you rather spend that money (and your time) on your childs college savings?

    Its up to you! But one way or another, the Hour Factor question will represent a giant shift in your mindset. And its a powerful vehicle for personal growth and development.

    Similar Posts:

    Share

    Post Comment

    One of my favorite parts of the 14-Day Credit Challenge is the buried treasures lesson because it gives students an opportunity to have massive personal growth and development.

    You see, when I teach people how to find their buried treasures, I also give them a financial tip about changing their mindset. After all, finding money wont change your life if you rush out and spend it frivolously.

    Instead, I give them a financial tool for personal growth and development.

    Its called the Hour Factor™ question.

    Let me explain ¦

    Instead of considering price alone, always consider the Hour Factor™ before making a purchase. The Hour Factor™ is the number of hours you will need to work to pay for something.

    And this number is a better indicator than the price. From a personal growth and development perspective, the most valuable thing we have is time ¦ time with our families, time pursuing our passions, time enjoying life. When you buy something, you are simultaneously making a commitment to spend time away from your family  (or away from your passions) so that you can work enough hours to pay for your purchase.

    So before you purchase anything, always ask yourself the Hour Factor question: Is it worth it to work ____ hours to pay for this?

    What do you think? Do you like this strategy? Leave a comment below and let me know …

    And for those of you who want to use this strategy, heres the process:

    1.     Start by figuring out your hourly after-tax wage. If you are paid hourly, just look at your paystub and divide the take-home (after-tax) pay by the number of hours your worked. If you are paid a salary, divide your annual after-tax salary by 2,080 hours (this is based upon a 40-hour work week, 52 weeks per year).  This is your after-tax wage.

    2.     Then, divide the price of something by your after-tax salary to computer the number of hours you must work to buy it. For instance, if your after-tax pay is $12.50, you will have to work ten hours to pay for something that costs $125.

    3.     Once you have done the math, ask the Hour Factor question. For instance: Is it worth it to work 10 hours away to pay for this? You can always change the question to make it more powerful. For instance, I ask: Is it worth it to work ____hours away from my children and wife to pay for this?

    Is it worth 30 minutes of your time to pay for a latté and muffin from the corner coffee shop each morning?

    Is it worth even 15 minutes? Or would you rather spend that money (and your time) on your childs college savings?

    Its up to you! But one way or another, the Hour Factor question will represent a giant shift in your mindset. And its a powerful vehicle for personal growth and development.

    Similar Posts:

    Share

    Post Comment

    One of my favorite parts of the 14-Day Credit Challenge is the buried treasures lesson because it gives students an opportunity to have massive personal growth and development.

    You see, when I teach people how to find their buried treasures, I also give them a financial tip about changing their mindset. After all, finding money wont change your life if you rush out and spend it frivolously.

    Instead, I give them a financial tool for personal growth and development.

    Its called the Hour Factor™ question.

    Let me explain ¦

    Instead of considering price alone, always consider the Hour Factor™ before making a purchase. The Hour Factor™ is the number of hours you will need to work to pay for something.

    And this number is a better indicator than the price. From a personal growth and development perspective, the most valuable thing we have is time ¦ time with our families, time pursuing our passions, time enjoying life. When you buy something, you are simultaneously making a commitment to spend time away from your family  (or away from your passions) so that you can work enough hours to pay for your purchase.

    So before you purchase anything, always ask yourself the Hour Factor question: Is it worth it to work ____ hours to pay for this?

    What do you think? Do you like this strategy? Leave a comment below and let me know …

    And for those of you who want to use this strategy, heres the process:

    1.     Start by figuring out your hourly after-tax wage. If you are paid hourly, just look at your paystub and divide the take-home (after-tax) pay by the number of hours your worked. If you are paid a salary, divide your annual after-tax salary by 2,080 hours (this is based upon a 40-hour work week, 52 weeks per year).  This is your after-tax wage.

    2.     Then, divide the price of something by your after-tax salary to computer the number of hours you must work to buy it. For instance, if your after-tax pay is $12.50, you will have to work ten hours to pay for something that costs $125.

    3.     Once you have done the math, ask the Hour Factor question. For instance: Is it worth it to work 10 hours away to pay for this? You can always change the question to make it more powerful. For instance, I ask: Is it worth it to work ____hours away from my children and wife to pay for this?

    Is it worth 30 minutes of your time to pay for a latté and muffin from the corner coffee shop each morning?

    Is it worth even 15 minutes? Or would you rather spend that money (and your time) on your childs college savings?

    Its up to you! But one way or another, the Hour Factor question will represent a giant shift in your mindset. And its a powerful vehicle for personal growth and development.

    Similar Posts:

    Share

    Post Comment

    The Hour Factor: A Financial Tip for Personal Growth and Development

    Written by Blake Teen on April 25, 2011.

    One of my favorite parts of the 14-Day Credit Challenge is the buried treasures lesson because it gives students an opportunity to have massive personal growth and development.

    You see, when I teach people how to find their buried treasures, I also give them a financial tip about changing their mindset. After all, finding money wont change your life if you rush out and spend it frivolously.

    Instead, I give them a financial tool for personal growth and development.

    Its called the Hour Factor™ question.

    Let me explain ¦

    Instead of considering price alone, always consider the Hour Factor™ before making a purchase. The Hour Factor™ is the number of hours you will need to work to pay for something.

    And this number is a better indicator than the price. From a personal growth and development perspective, the most valuable thing we have is time ¦ time with our families, time pursuing our passions, time enjoying life. When you buy something, you are simultaneously making a commitment to spend time away from your family  (or away from your passions) so that you can work enough hours to pay for your purchase.

    So before you purchase anything, always ask yourself the Hour Factor question: Is it worth it to work ____ hours to pay for this?

    What do you think? Do you like this strategy? Leave a comment below and let me know …

    And for those of you who want to use this strategy, heres the process:

    1.     Start by figuring out your hourly after-tax wage. If you are paid hourly, just look at your paystub and divide the take-home (after-tax) pay by the number of hours your worked. If you are paid a salary, divide your annual after-tax salary by 2,080 hours (this is based upon a 40-hour work week, 52 weeks per year).  This is your after-tax wage.

    2.     Then, divide the price of something by your after-tax salary to computer the number of hours you must work to buy it. For instance, if your after-tax pay is $12.50, you will have to work ten hours to pay for something that costs $125.

    3.     Once you have done the math, ask the Hour Factor question. For instance: Is it worth it to work 10 hours away to pay for this? You can always change the question to make it more powerful. For instance, I ask: Is it worth it to work ____hours away from my children and wife to pay for this?

    Is it worth 30 minutes of your time to pay for a latté and muffin from the corner coffee shop each morning?

    Is it worth even 15 minutes? Or would you rather spend that money (and your time) on your childs college savings?

    Its up to you! But one way or another, the Hour Factor question will represent a giant shift in your mindset. And its a powerful vehicle for personal growth and development.

    Similar Posts:

    Share

    One of my favorite parts of the 14-Day Credit Challenge is the buried treasures lesson because it gives students an opportunity to have massive personal growth and development.

    You see, when I teach people how to find their buried treasures, I also give them a financial tip about changing their mindset. After all, finding money wont change your life if you rush out and spend it frivolously.

    Instead, I give them a financial tool for personal growth and development.

    Its called the Hour Factor™ question.

    Let me explain ¦

    Instead of considering price alone, always consider the Hour Factor™ before making a purchase. The Hour Factor™ is the number of hours you will need to work to pay for something.

    And this number is a better indicator than the price. From a personal growth and development perspective, the most valuable thing we have is time ¦ time with our families, time pursuing our passions, time enjoying life. When you buy something, you are simultaneously making a commitment to spend time away from your family  (or away from your passions) so that you can work enough hours to pay for your purchase.

    So before you purchase anything, always ask yourself the Hour Factor question: Is it worth it to work ____ hours to pay for this?

    What do you think? Do you like this strategy? Leave a comment below and let me know …

    And for those of you who want to use this strategy, heres the process:

    1.     Start by figuring out your hourly after-tax wage. If you are paid hourly, just look at your paystub and divide the take-home (after-tax) pay by the number of hours your worked. If you are paid a salary, divide your annual after-tax salary by 2,080 hours (this is based upon a 40-hour work week, 52 weeks per year).  This is your after-tax wage.

    2.     Then, divide the price of something by your after-tax salary to computer the number of hours you must work to buy it. For instance, if your after-tax pay is $12.50, you will have to work ten hours to pay for something that costs $125.

    3.     Once you have done the math, ask the Hour Factor question. For instance: Is it worth it to work 10 hours away to pay for this? You can always change the question to make it more powerful. For instance, I ask: Is it worth it to work ____hours away from my children and wife to pay for this?

    Is it worth 30 minutes of your time to pay for a latté and muffin from the corner coffee shop each morning?

    Is it worth even 15 minutes? Or would you rather spend that money (and your time) on your childs college savings?

    Its up to you! But one way or another, the Hour Factor question will represent a giant shift in your mindset. And its a powerful vehicle for personal growth and development.

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  • She Left Me, Met Another Man, and Married Him
  • 10 Tips for Being a Better Negotiator
  • The Pamphlet Meeting (Eight Years of Personal Growth and Development)
  • Personal Growth and Development Over the Next Six Months
  • Giving Stores your Zip Code: Yay or Nay?
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